In anticipation of the DVD/Blu-Ray release of Wes Anderson’s “Moonrise Kingdom” – and in celebration of it being the first Anderson movie I unabashedly adore – every day until October 16th, I’ll be highlighting one of the (many) elements of the film that I love. This time: the cinematography.

In anticipation of the DVD/Blu-Ray release of Wes Anderson’s “Moonrise Kingdom” – and in celebration of it being the first Anderson movie I unabashedly adore – every day until October 16th, I’ll be highlighting one of the (many) elements of the film that I love. This time: Young Love.

In lieu of Roman Polanski's "Repulsion" airing this Saturday, I took to Twitter to ask folks what their favourite Polanski movie was. In the wake of great cinematographer Harry Savides' passing, I also asked which of his films were people's favourites.

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In anticipation of the DVD/Blu-Ray release of Wes Anderson’s “Moonrise Kingdom” – and in celebration of it being the first Anderson movie I unabashedly love – every day until October 16th, I’ll be highlighting one of the (many) elements of the film that I love. First up: Bob Balaban as the Narrator.

At Saturday Night at the Movies we think of movies as more than just entertainment. Movies should be thought about and processed. Great film writing can help us do that. Every week there’s a whole slew of new film writing worthy of being appreciated. So, every Monday we’ll select three of our favorite pieces from the past week and present them here for your reading pleasure.This week we highlight pieces that trace the history of movie spies, praise horror anthologies, and discuss "Man with a Movie Camera."

Want to see all those clips SNAM host, Thom Ernst, mentioned on air? Look no further to see videos of "Casanova" star Donald Sutherland talking Fellini, as well as actors James Stewart, Henry Fonda, Jack Lemmon and Charlton Heston talk about stardom.

This week Owen Gleiberman wrote a lengthy piece discussing how he hasn't liked any Paul Thomas Anderson movie since "Boogie Nights." Part of his problem is that Anderson stopped making movies with characters we can care about. Considering this weekend we're airing Don Siegel's "The Beguiled" - which doesn't exactly have Clint Eastwood playing the nicest of characters - I thought I'd take to Twitter and ask people if they always need to like or relate to movie characters.

When the three major posters for “The Master” were released, they were met with the same curiosity and uncertainty many felt after seeing the movie itself. Now that we’ve seen the film we wield knowledge of its thematic concerns. So, armed with the ancient art of overthinking and the knowledge that Paul Thomas Anderson personally oversaw poster design himself, here’s how each “The Master” poster relates to the film’s central occupations.

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At Saturday Night at the Movies we think of movies as more than just entertainment. Movies should be thought about and processed. Great film writing can help us do that. Every week there’s a whole slew of new film writing worthy of being appreciated. So, every Monday we’ll select three of our favorite pieces from the past week and present them here for your reading pleasure.This week we highlight pieces considering why Rian Johnson's films fail to fully resonate, a list of ten films you didn't know where horror, and the irony-less mysteries of Werner Herzog's films. 

Andrew Wagner's "Starting Out in the Evening" - airing this Saturday on SNAM - is one of my favorite movies about a writer and the writing process. So, I thought I would take to Twitter to see what other's people favorite writers writing movies are. There were a vareity of responses, but it inadvertently turned into a bit of a struggle between Charlie Kaufman's "Adaptation" and The Coen Brothers' "Barton Fink" for supremacy.

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